Homage to the HoP

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A long search for chromatic woodtype came up trumps, with several new founts acquired this week.

Give Me Hops celebrates this wonderful herbaceous perennial and the upsurge in independent craft brewers creating hoppy IPA’s and Stouts.

The word HOPS was printed with shaded type, chosen as its ornamentation beers an uncanny resemblance to hop cone scales and the young leaves of the plant.

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There is no makers name on this Victorian 30-Line shaded type, though it is likely to be UK made – Ideas anyone?

Shaded Wood Type

Registering the second colour went fairly well though there was some variation due to the handmade nature and age of the type, as well as the intricacies of hand feeding for second passing on the press – though imperfection is good right?

Hooksmith Press London

Cheers and Good Health!

Antipodes

Antipodes Antipodes 2

Walk this way

Here’s one straight from the press; directionally accurate to within 6 Pica when hung vertically anywhere in the world.  No calibration required.

For those who don’t know, the antipodes of where you are, is the exact opposite of where you are – on the other side of the globe (if that makes any sense?).

In New Zealand, however, if you mention the Antipodes, people tend to think of a distant off-shore group of inhospitable volcanic islands to the south of NZ (They lie 860 kilometres to the southeast of Stewart Island/Rakiura). The islands are home to amazing mega herbs and a ground-dwelling parakeet (among an amazing array of flora and fauna).

Interestingly, here in London, we are roughly antipodal to The Antipodes, but the term more frequently refers to both New Zealand and Australia. I quite like being called an antipodean, gives a touch of Ol’ world glamour…

For those interested, this lovely old copper-topped arrow is printed alongside a worn Day and Collins ‘Caxton #6’ wooden font; inked with a shaded 2-colour affect inspired by the colour of the Antipodes Island parakeet (Cyanoramphus unicolor)!

Hooksmith in London

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This gallery contains 8 photos.

After 15 months printing in Hamilton NZ, Hooksmith Press relocates to East London UK.  3 months at sea, and a few issues getting everything into our mid terrace, Leytonstone rental.. most things are unpacked and setting the first form can … Continue reading

Where have all the sheep gone?


Wayleggo (ˌweɪlɛˈɡəʊ), interj, Origin; NZ, away here! let go!; a shepherd’s call to a dog on completion of a task

Maybe its living in the Waikato, but seems that all I see these days are cows. Sheep are in decline, but they have shaped our past and landscape.

Back before dairying found its way into the high country of the South Island; I spent a summer as a rousie in a shearing gang , but weirdly my most enduring memory of sheep-dogs is Sunday TV. I’m sure NZ readers of a certain age will remember the amazing feats on “A Dogs Show”

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Replacing the trip springs on the Vandercook SP15

My search for a Vandercook SP15  began roughly one and a half years before locating one, in the deep south of New Zealand.  I’d used one once (during a night course at St Martins in London), but never got to appreciate its intricacies  I’m mechanically-minded but not aware of what to check for, when it came to going over the press I was going to buy.

 As it transpired, there would have been give away signs that the trip springs were broken – ie a lot of inked impression on the cylinder blanket.  Anyhow it was during cleaning once the press arrived that it finally dawned; as the toothbrush knocked the remains of the broken spring out.  Not to worry,though, Fritz at NA graphics soon had my order for new parts as well as a manual.  I had read many articles on Paul Moxon’s Vanderblog concerning the replacement procedure and I was relieved to read read that the springs could be replaced with out the need to remove the cylinder carriage plates. http://vandercookpress.info/vanderblog/?s=replacing+trip+spring

When the parts arrived I made myself a tool (see bottom picture) and set about replacing the springs.

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